How To Make Springerle Cookies

Last week I tried my hand at Springerle cookies, a Christmas cookie from the Alsace-Lorraine area of France, and into Germany and Switzerland. I’d seen pictures of them before but never made them, and after being tempted into purchasing one of the cookie molds at a Christmas market at Freiburg, it was time.
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A springerle cookie mold can be used to make cookies or christmas ornaments

How To Make Springerle Cookies

Last week I tried my hand at Springerle cookies, a Christmas cookie from the Alsace-Lorraine area of France, and into Germany and Switzerland. I’d seen pictures of them before but never made them, and after being tempted into purchasing one of the cookie molds at a Christmas market at Freiburg, it was time.

Now the complicated part for these cookies doesn’t come into the actual making of the dough. That part is rather easy! With five ingredients, and an electric mixer with a whisk attachment, it comes together in a cinch. No, the difficult part is actually respecting the resting times and pressing the mold into the dough. Here are some tips for how to make springerle cookies to make them foolproof for you!

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TIPS FOR MAKING SPRINGERLE COOKIES:

WHERE CAN I BUY SPRINGERLE COOKIE MOLDS?

You find them at Christmas Markets in Europe but can purchase them online here: www.springerle.com or check out Etsy or King Arthur Flour or even, my website boutique.

WHY DOES THE SPRINGERLE DOUGH REST FOR SO LONG?

There are two important points when making these cookies when the dough has to rest. The first is after making the dough. I kept the dough in the mixing bowl, pressed plastic wrap on top, and then transferred it to the refrigerator to chill and set up.

The recipe said “for a couple hours or overnight” and I’m here to tell you that a couple hours is very different than overnight in terms of working with the dough. After two hours, it was still too soft, making it sticky and more difficult to work with. It was much easier after resting overnight. The second waiting point was after the cookie mold was pressed into the dough. The 12-24 hour rest on a countertop dries the outside of the cookie ensuring the delicate design will stay after they bake.

The hardest part about making these cookies is being patient enough to walk through all the steps! The total resting time can be more than 24 hours – but it’s absolutely worth it!

I HATE ANISE SEED! CAN I LEAVE IT OUT?

I hear you. It’s not my favorite either and this is the traditional flavoring! But isn’t that the huge bonus of making them yourself? You can flavor them however you like! There are two points you can add seasonings. The first is to the dough- add any extracts or spices that you like. Extract examples include: almond, lemon, orange, lavender, or vanilla. Spice examples include: nutmeg, gingerbread seasoning, or cardamom.

Before you bake them, you can also sprinkle seasonings on the pan. When I made these, I dusted the pan with a fun Alsatian Winter Sugar that I have which is a blend of raw sugar, cinnamon, cardamom, anise, and vanilla. In another batch, I used vanilla sugar. You can sprinkle spices as well, like ground cinnamon.

Let your imagination run wild! The options are endless!

HOW DO I GET THE PERFECT DESIGN ON TOP?

Make sure you following the resting times. Then when you’re ready to press the cookie mold into the dough, liberally dust the surface, your rolling pin, the top of the dough, and the mold with cornstarch. Press in the mold with even pressure. It’ll take 1-2 tries, then you’ll get it!

HOW DO I KNOW WHEN SPRINGERLE COOKIES ARE DONE?

This is a HUGE tip! Bake the cookies in the bottom third of your oven! They’ll rise up on a foot but they won’t brown on top because of the low temperature. Respect the baking time, and then remove from the oven and test to see if they are done by gently moving the cookie back and forth. If it barely moves or is firm, it’s done! Let cool completely on the pans.

DO SPRINGERLE COOKIES TASTE GOOD?

Yes! The top is a little crunchy but the inside is chewy and delicious like a thick sugar cookie crossed with a macaron.

WHAT IS THE SPRINGERLE COOKIE TEXTURE LIKE?

The perfect Springerle should have a delicate, crunchy outside and a slightly chewy center. If you’re looking for a soft, cake-like cookie, Springerle are not it. But they are so, so delicious and perfect for dunking in your favorite coffee or cocoa.

WHY CORNSTARCH? WHY NOT FLOUR?

Cornstarch doesn’t absorb as much moisture as flour so it will stay on the surface of the dough more so than flour. And it’s easier to brush off!

I’VE PRESSED THE MOLD IN, NOW WHAT? TIPS FOR CUTTING OUT THE COOKIES.

The easiest is to use a cookie cutter that is the right size to trim the access dough from around the imprint. You can use a pasta cutter as well or a dough cutter or knife.


HOW DO I MAKE THEM INTO CHRISTMAS TREE ORNAMENTS?

Just after cutting out the cookie, take the bottom of a pen (clean!), chopstick or a kebab skewer and press it into the dough to create a hole. After they’re baked and cool, thread a beautiful ribbon through the hole and there you go!

HOW LONG DO SPRINGERLE COOKIES KEEP?

Traditionally, these cookies were baked in advance to let the anise flavor develop over time. Once you’ve baked your Springerle cookies, store them in tins or other containers with tightly fitted lids. It’s recommended to add a piece of whole wheat bread so they don’t dry out too much in the tin. I also like to lay the cookies between parchment paper to prevent them from sticking and ensure they’re beautiful design stays intact. While some traditional recipes purposefully “age” them for up to a couple of weeks, I think they’re best up until 3-5 days, when they’re still chewy on the inside.

CAN SPRINGERLE COOKIES BE FROZEN?

Yes, you can technically freeze springerle cookies after baking to store them for longer periods of time. This would keep the cookie texture more like what it is within the first couple of days after baking them. If you love the flavor of these cookies and want to be able to enjoy them from time to time without having to bake them, then freezing a few is definitely worth it!!

springerle cookies being cut out of dough

And here’s the recipe! With lots of details du coup! I hope you enjoy making these as families have for years and years, and wish you a Merry Christmas!

SAVE THE TIPS AND THE RECIPE FOR LATER BY PINNING IT TO PINTEREST!

Springerle Cookie Recipe

A beautiful cookie from the Alsace-Lorraine area in France, Germany, and Switzerland! With their intricate design, they make for a perfect gift around the holidays or to hang on a Christmas tree.

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs, room temp
  • 500 g (4 cups) powdered sugar (icing/confectioners)
  • 1/8 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon kirsch (optional)
  • 420-440 g (3 1/2 cups) cake flour (non-rising, T45)
  • anise seed or other flavoring (optional)

Instructions

  1. Beat the eggs with the whisk attachment until foaming in an electric mixer. Slowly add in the powdered sugar and whip on medium speed for 10-15 minutes until the mixture is thick and resembles a buttercream. In the last 5 minutes, add the pinch of baking powder, and the kirsch or other flavoring.
  2. Slowly add in the flour, whipping on low-medium speed. Then wrap well with plastic wrap touching the surface and chill several hours or overnight.
  3. Roll out small pieces at a time on a cornstarch-dusted surface to 1/4 inch (6mm) thick. Dust the top lightly with cornstarch and press the mold into the dough. Cut around the design, and lay on a cornstarch dusted surface to rest for 12-24 hours, avoiding a drafty or humid area.
  4. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 145C/290F. Place each cookie on a damp paper towel for about 30 seconds to moisten the bottom of the cookie and then transfer to a parchment lined tray (this can be sprinkled with a seasoning of choice).
  5. Bake for 18-20 minutes. The cookie will rise on a little foot, and be just slightly brown on the bottom when done. (If baking two trays at a time, be sure to flip the trays halfway through).
  6. Keep in an airtight container at room temperature for 3 to 5 days, or light dry and use as ornaments.

Notes

About the flour: It is strongly recommended to use a fine flour (cake or pastry for best results). If in France, this would be a T45. If you have to use all-purpose, you will use considerably less at 2 ¾ cups (340 g). Go by the texture as shown in the video and indicated in the recipe.

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A springerle cookie mold can be used to make cookies or christmas ornaments
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Leave A Comment & Rate This Recipe!

If I want to add flavoring oil, how much would you recommend? In addition to kirsch? (Only 4 stars as i have not yet made the recipe. I will return when I have tried it out.)

Hi Anima! You can use 1 tsp vanilla extract or ½ tsp almond/lemon/or other extract – used in place of the kirsch. You can also sprinkle the pan with flavored sugars to place the cookies on top of before baking.:)

Can I use Kamut flour instead of pastry flour?

Hi Katherine! You could try but unfortunately, I wouldn’t recommend it. Kamut is a lot more coarse than regular AP Flour and may produce a denser cookie. If you do try it, I would suggest adding even less than the all-purpose measurement. Hope this helps!

Can I use these molds with other cookie recipes? Will it work with a butter cookie or a sugar cookie?

I want to use bakers ammonia how much should I use instead of regular baking soda and do I dissolve it in a bit of water or milk? Thank you Nadia Logar

Hi Nadia! You can use a equal substitution of Baker’s Ammonia for the baking powder in my recipe, let us know how it turns it out!

Th last direction is to sprinkle a flavor. Such as? I’m thinking sugar but what else?

Hi Sharon! The options for sprinkling flavors are endless, whatever flavors might interest you will certainly work! When I made these, I dusted the pan with a fun Alsatian Winter Sugar that I have which is a blend of raw sugar, cinnamon, cardamom, anise, and vanilla. In another batch, I used vanilla sugar. You can sprinkle spices as well, like ground cinnamon.

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